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Research Peptides for Tendon Repair

Peptides for Tendon RepairResearch peptides for tendon repair exist in the form of BPC-157, but more work needs to be done. BPC-157 peptides are still in the study stage. BPC-157 or body protective compound. It is a man-made protein that shows positive results in healing bones, wounds, improving blood vessels and increasing human growth hormone. BPC 157 is a pentadecapeptide and is not for human use. But, in new studies show it can protect the heart, kidney, and liver. In this post we look at what conditions that one  day BPC-157 peptide will help!

What are the Treatments for Tendinopathy?

Already numerous approaches are available to treat tendinopathy, and research peptides are among them.

So far, tendinitis and tendon adhesions are managed with the following:
-physical treatment
-manual
-electrical stimulation
-medications

Others include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, oral steroids, and research peptides such as BPC-157.
There are other treatments for tendinopathy, such as platelet-rich plasma jab:
-platelet-rich fibrin glue jab
-tendon ultrasound
-extracorporeal shock wave treatment

Still, the most commonly used approach is to recommend that the patient change their exercise habits or perform therapeutic exercises, such as deep tissue massage, myofascial release, and isokinetic stretching. However, the pathophysiology of tendinopathy is not yet well understood, and treatment is limited.

Many treatments are only cell-based therapies that have shown to be effective in animal models and humans.
To repair damaged tendons, cells must be seeded to the tendon and then cultured before tendon repair can begin. The process of tendon repair, known as tendon healing, is comprised of three primary strategies:

-degeneration of the tendon
-formation of a scar tissue repair
-remodeling of the tendon

Tendon repair can take 3-6 months to restore functional strength fully. The slow tendon repair process means that the number of cells available for tendon repair is negligible.

What is Tendinopathy?

The term “tendinopathy” initially describes the pathology of tendons and has become used to describe many kinds of tendon injury. There are multiple causes of tendon pathology, such as tendonitis, tenosynovitis, tenosynovial friction syndrome, and various degenerative disorders.

Tendon degeneration causes
-rupture
-leading to an increased risk of tendonitis
-adhesions
-attrition
-tendinopathy

Tendinopathy is a painful condition where pain usually occurs at the musculotendinous junction in the presence of overuse or repetitive strain. About 25% of the total population is affected by tendinopathy and tendon pathology in some form.

What are the Signs of Tendinopathy?

Tendinopathy can be asymptomatic and can cause tendon pain and weakness. The most commonly affected tendons are those in the arm and hand, including the Achilles tendon and the long flexor tendons of the fingers. In its chronic stages, it can cause inflammation, tendon tears, and tendinosis, a degenerative state in which the cells in the tendon become dysfunctional and unable to remodel. In this state, the tendon becomes thickened and less elastic. Unlike tendinosis, tendinopathy cannot be reversed! But, you can prevent it. Tendinopathy usually begins in young adulthood, but it can affect tendons throughout life, including the wrist and fingers

What is a Tendon?

Tendon is a connective tissue that connects muscle to bone, transmitting force from one end of strength to another. Muscles are capable of contraction, enabling rapid movement of limbs and extending during rest periods. Tendons perform a much more important role; they connect power to bone, allow the muscle to relax when the muscle is no longer in action, and transmit forces between muscle and bone. Tendons have a low breaking strength, poor regeneration, and limited remodeling ability.

The function of tendons in humans is to withstand force and act as shock absorbers, transferring power across joints and transmitting it to the bone.

Research Peptides for Tendon Repair

Several studies are evolving, particularly the use of cell treatment in tendon repair acute or chronic degenerative tendinopathies.

Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have been used for tendon repair and cell treatment for tendinopathy, with promising results. They come from the bone marrow and have multilineage differentiation capacity, including that of tendon-like tissue.

BMSCs play a significant role in maintaining tendon integrity and repair. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) have the potential for self-renewal and multilineage differentiation, with a wide array of therapeutic options that may apply to tendon regeneration.

ADMSCs provide a rich source of easily available autologous cells, and the properties of these cells suggest that they are a suitable candidate for therapeutic use. In addition, these stem cells appear to have therapeutic potential in chronic tendon degeneration because they are more resistant to the effects of tendinopathy than are BMSCs.

What is the Best Peptide for Tendon Repair?

However, few studies have used BMSCs or ADMSCs in humans, and tendon pathologies are still a neglected field. However, new research chemicals are emerging that show promising results in healing wounds one that is showing the best results is BPC-157 peptides. BPC-157 in studies has regenerative and healing effects that might one day be reducing these conditions. To read more about does BPC 157 heal ligaments read this link here!